Offering a Healing Hand in Liberia
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Saturday, 18th October

Proper handwashing is the single most effective way to prevent the spread of infections

ottawahealth:

image

Today is Global Handwashing Day. Proper handwashing is the single most effective way to prevent the spread of infections.

Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 15 seconds or use hand sanitizer. For more information visit OttawaPublicHealth.ca

(via pubhealth)

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Friday, 17th October
Counterfeiting Ebola: Fakes, Frauds and other Malarkey
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Thursday, 16th October
Firestone Did What Governments Have Not: Stopped Ebola In Its Tracks
Aid workers ask where was WHO in Ebola outbreak?
Chagas disease - inheriting a silent killer
pubhealth:

Polio: Pakistan polio outbreak hits record high
Pakistan has recorded its highest number of polio cases for 15 years, with health officials blaming the rise on attacks on immunisation teams.
The number of new cases in 2014 so far is 202, exceeding the 199 cases in 2001 but short of the 558 cases in 1999.
Most of the infections are in the north-western tribal region where militants have targeted health teams.
Militants there accuse doctors of being spies and say the vaccinations are part of a Western plot to sterilise Muslims.
Suspicions over the programmes worsened after the US was accused of using a fake vaccination programme during its tracking of al-Qaeda chief Osama Bin Laden in Pakistan in 2011.
Since December 2012, about 60 people, including health workers and police providing security to medical teams, have been killed by Taliban militants targeting polio teams.
The BBC’s Shaimaa Khalil in Islamabad says the rise in cases is hugely embarrassing to Pakistan.
The country has failed to curb the disease despite massive investment on immunisation programmes by the international community, she adds.
Earlier this year, the World Health Organization imposed travel restrictions on the country meaning all Pakistanis must now carry proof of vaccination before travelling abroad.
Pakistan is one of three countries where polio is endemic - the other two being Afghanistan and Nigeria.
(From BBC) 

pubhealth:

Polio: Pakistan polio outbreak hits record high

Pakistan has recorded its highest number of polio cases for 15 years, with health officials blaming the rise on attacks on immunisation teams.

The number of new cases in 2014 so far is 202, exceeding the 199 cases in 2001 but short of the 558 cases in 1999.

Most of the infections are in the north-western tribal region where militants have targeted health teams.

Militants there accuse doctors of being spies and say the vaccinations are part of a Western plot to sterilise Muslims.

Suspicions over the programmes worsened after the US was accused of using a fake vaccination programme during its tracking of al-Qaeda chief Osama Bin Laden in Pakistan in 2011.

Since December 2012, about 60 people, including health workers and police providing security to medical teams, have been killed by Taliban militants targeting polio teams.

The BBC’s Shaimaa Khalil in Islamabad says the rise in cases is hugely embarrassing to Pakistan.

The country has failed to curb the disease despite massive investment on immunisation programmes by the international community, she adds.

Earlier this year, the World Health Organization imposed travel restrictions on the country meaning all Pakistanis must now carry proof of vaccination before travelling abroad.

Pakistan is one of three countries where polio is endemic - the other two being Afghanistan and Nigeria.

(From BBC

nprglobalhealth:

Popping A Baby Out Like A Cork, And Other Birth Innovations

An invention to help with obstructed labor has turned some heads — and not just because the idea came from a party trick on YouTube.

The Odon Device, created by Argentine car mechanic Jorge Odon, guides a folded plastic sleeve around the baby’s head. A little bit of air is then pumped between the two plastic layers, cushioning the baby’s head and allowing it to be sucked out. This trick for removing a cork from an empty wine bottle works the same way.

The device has been embraced by the World Health Organization and is being developed by the global medical technology company BD. Once clinical trials are done, the WHO and individual countries will have to approve it before it’s sold. BD hasn’t said how much it will charge, but each one is expected to cost less than $50 to make.

"If proven safe and effective," a 2011 presentation on Odon’s invention said, “the Odon Device will be the first innovation in operative vaginal delivery since the development of forceps centuries ago and vacuum extractor decades ago.”

The Odon device shows that “good ideas can come from anyone and anywhere,” says Wendy Taylor, director of USAID’s Center for Accelerating Innovation and Impact.

If you’re in the business of innovating, she says, there’s no need to strive for mechanical complexity. Some of the biggest breakthroughs are cheap and simple. And, she says, the strategy for scaling something up for worldwide use “is just as important as the innovation itself.”

One of the crowning innovations in preventing death during childbirth was convincing doctors to wash their hands in between handling corpses and delivering babies. And many argue that fancier tools are just part of a tradition of unnecessary interference that circumvented the best tool in the box: gravity.

With that in mind, here are five ideas that struck us as innovative and surprising (some more likely to succeed than others):

1. Ready Yet?

A team at the University of California, San Francisco created a “cervical cap" to check whether a woman is about to go into labor. The device can detect changes in the collagen of the cervix. The softening of collagen as the cervix opens is a telltale sign a baby’s on its way. Information from the cap’s sensors can be transmitted to a nearby cellphone, which can send the data to a doctor. The device can be inserted briefly once a day, without a professional’s help.

2. Back To Basics

A team at Massachusetts General Hospital developed a uterine balloon kit to stop postpartum hemorrhage. It consists of a condom tied to a catheter. Water from the catheter fills the condom in the uterus, creating pressure that can stop the bleeding. The kit has been tested successfully in South Sudan and Kenya. A similar tool in the U.S. can cost more than $300 each, Mass General says, compared with less than $5 each for the simple balloon kit.

Continue reading.

Top Drawing: The Odon Device was inspired by a YouTube video about how to remove a cork from the inside of a wine bottle. (Courtesy of the Odon Device)

Bottom Drawing: A ”cervical cap" detects changes in the collagen of the cervix to determine if a baby’s on its way. Information from the cap’s sensors can be transmitted to a nearby cellphone, which can send the data to a doctor. (Courtesy of UCSF)

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Wednesday, 8th October

fishingboatproceeds:

We’re getting closer to a world without polio.

(via The Gates Foundation)

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Tuesday, 7th October
Sanitation is a basic human right
Reeling from Ebola, WHO warns of MERS risk to Africa
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Sunday, 5th October
World Bank Group to Nearly Double Funding in Ebola Crisis to $400 Million
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Saturday, 4th October
Global Health Essentials Course 2015
A Doctor Turned Mayor Solves A Murder Mystery In Colombia
Dr. Adam Levine discusses Ebola on CNN's State of the Union with Candy Crowley
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Wednesday, 1st October